Associative horizon

This essay basically explains me. This gives me the vocabulary to properly express the following thought: I have a genius-level associative horizon, subgenius intelligence and inferior conscientiousness. This identification explains why I seem to share qualitative characteristics with actual geniuses, but cannot show much of anything for real creative output, being hampered primarily by low conscientiousness (ADHD-Inattentive, executive function disorder, etc.) and secondarily by mediocre intelligence.

I could do a point-by-point of the article above, but there’d be no point. True on all counts. Action plan time, what to do?

Cooijmans suggests that conscientiousness is the best candidate for improvement by nurture, but my professional and personal diagnoses suggest that I can’t hope to improve conscientiousness much beyond “marginal” -> “below average but not the worst ever”. Which means that a career in music (conscientiousness plus associative horizon) is probably not a great plan (but could be maybe if I were on the right drugs?)

Instead, I should consider myself to fall somewhat into the associative horizon plus intelligence class. In which case there’s still basically no hope for me :-P. Except maybe as a marginal nothingperson working the parking lot attendant night shift and blathering on the internet in my spare time. Still, it is obvious that working on my weak conscientiousness is the key to increasing the quality and quantity of my creative output, so that continues to be the plan.

Also, apparently I should do more erratic humorist stuff. I thought the computer science one was pretty funny, but maybe that’s just me?

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About Aeoli Pera

Maybe do this later?
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9 Responses to Associative horizon

  1. Gegen Cro-Mags says:

    You’re, what, 20 years old? Your brain isn’t even fully formed yet.

  2. Heaviside says:

    If conscientiousness is supposed to be able to be improved through hard work how does he know that’s a symptom and not a cause? A real solution would be one that allows you to increase your capacity for hard work without doing any hard work.

    I think the overvaluation of conscientiousness in contemporary society is just the most damning measure of the proletarianization of culture. Real human beings shouldn’t have to work.

    • Aeoli Pera says:

      >If conscientiousness is supposed to be able to be improved through hard work how does he know that’s a symptom and not a cause?

      One ought to produce exponential returns and the other produces linear returns.

      >A real solution would be one that allows you to increase your capacity for hard work without doing any hard work.

      I think this would be more correctly described as technology. I want both, clearly. And a pony, but father says we’d need a bigger yard.

      >I think the overvaluation of conscientiousness in contemporary society is just the most damning measure of the proletarianization of culture. Real human beings shouldn’t have to work.

      Agree to the former and disagree with the latter.

  3. Aeoli Pera says:

    I haven’t tried one, no. Standing is best for some kinds of thinking, and sitting for others, and strolling for yet others. I think the sort of writing I do here benefits from sitting, whereas productive and practical work probably benefit from standing. Strolling seems to be best when you’re fishing for general inspiration.

  4. chance a not says:

    “I have a genius-level associative horizon”

    Not a chance.
    You have an above-average associative horizon; that is to be conceded.

  5. Rickaby says:

    Reading your posts, it’s weird how similar we are. We have the same personality, the same functioning, and the same problems, generally speaking. I’ll contact you soon and ask for some advice regarding life and functioning stuff (coz I be on dat younger age time).

    • Aeoli Pera says:

      E-mail is aeoli dot pera at gmail, Skype is aeoli dot pera, or just in the comments is fine. Probably get the best response rate in the comments, but even that isn’t perfect.

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