Probably related to associative horizon

-When a thing becomes ubiquitous in our environment, we become neurologically adapted to it, such that it becomes incredibly difficult to explicitly recognize it. Nevertheless, we expect it and nothing less. This is why people often don’t ‘get’ free market mechanisms. Prices are just ‘there’. Prosperity is just ‘there’. Arbitrage is just ‘there’–etc. etc. Only certain types of meta-oriented people naturally think about and analyze overly familiar and ubiquitous phenomena and relate them to other things in interesting ways.

Aimless Gromar
http://www.aimlessgromar.com/2014/06/08/throwing-down-notes-an-update/

Seems to be the mechanism behind the “narrowing mammalian phenomena”:

Resistance to conformism;
Resistance to suggestion;
Resistance to conditioning;
Resistance to automating tasks; preferring and inclined to “keep thinking” even when performing repetitive tasks;
Resistance to nonverbal communication (“body language” and the nonverbal components of speech); that is, not intuitively and unawarely interpreting or broadcasting such;
Resistance to socialization;
Resistance to empathy; that is, not intuitively and unawarely sensing what goes on inside the mind of the other person one is communicating with; not forming “theory of mind” when communicating;
Resistance to “emotion”; able to use ratio rather than emotion as the basis for behaviour.

Paul Cooijmans
http://www.paulcooijmans.com/genius/associative_horizon.html

Due merely to craving novel stimuli? An interesting line of thought.

If so, I’d hypothesize that the inattentive subtype of ADHD is due an internal form of novelty generation. The environment fails to provide sufficient stimulation to exhaust the brain’s energy, so the brain creates its own novelty by randomly combining familiar ideas and perceptions into new ones. This internal stimulation can become far more interesting than the environment, so the environment gets ignored (except in cases of high stimulation).

Interestingly (from the same post), such people seem to draw inspiration from abstract natural forms:

If I end up having a dry spell (what writer doesn’t hit that point), I take a nice, long walk outside which provides more than enough stimulus for a post on social dynamics or culture.

Aimless Gromar
Ibid.

I noticed a few days ago (during a bike ride) that the woods were highly stimulating to my imagination because they call to mind A) a large number of fantasy tropes that I absorbed in my teens, and B) a large number of visual oddities and ideas from semi-random natural shapes in the leaves, branches, rocks, etc. As an example of the latter type, I might see a large, curved branch that looks like a too-large bow, and think up a fantasy character who might use such an extravagantly large bow (a large centaur comes to mind).

About Aeoli Pera

Maybe do this later?
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4 Responses to Probably related to associative horizon

  1. Glenn says:

    “I noticed a few days ago (during a bike ride) that the woods were highly stimulating to my imagination because they call to mind A) a large number of fantasy tropes that I absorbed in my teens, and B) a large number of visual oddities and ideas from semi-random natural shapes in the leaves, branches, rocks, etc. As an example of the latter type, I might see a large, curved branch that looks like a too-large bow, and think up a fantasy character who might use such an extravagantly large bow (a large centaur comes to mind).”

    BINGO! My reluctant preference for city life (and love of architecture) explained, as well as why I feel that environments that require me to travel by car on a daily basis are intensely mentally numbing. The forms I pick up on are probably less fleshed-out than yours, though.

  2. lflick says:

    Here’s a fun rabbit hole for you to dive into sometime. I think I read the whole site holed up in the server room back in the old days. Your post reminded me of this because the guy argues that most humans are physically addicted to boredom.

    http://www.datapacrat.com/Opinion/Reciprocality/

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