Myopia as an indicator for mutation accumulation in populations

Because the eye is a complicated beast requiring many interdependent instructions for assembly, microscopic errors have macroscopic effects on the final product. It occurred to me that population rates for myopia are therefore a good barometer for mutation rates in those populations. The same may be true for other irreducibly complex physical structures in the body (as explained in Michael Behe’s book), such as blood clotting, which do not respond well to errors in the DNA code. Simpler genetic problems, like color blindness, cannot be used in the same way.

This could be contrasted with populations’ IQ scores to tease out the irreducibly complex formations of the brain that I’ve predicted are responsible for IQs that bust the bell curve rarity estimates.

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About Aeoli Pera

Maybe do this later?
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One Response to Myopia as an indicator for mutation accumulation in populations

  1. Craig says:

    I’m on the extreme end of myopia, had glasses when I was 4 years old. Wearing prescription glasses for the first time, is only comparable to LSD. A flat descending walkway turns into steps, with black holes appearing on both sides. It was f$%cked up.

    I believe there is an epigenetic component, even though all my family as they age need glasses, none needed them as young as I.

    My children, all have better then 20/20 vision, eldest is 10 years… So we’ll see in the next few years… MY wife wears glasses too.

    I certainly have a better diet then my mum did… Grew bigger then everyone else in my family too. Plus our family diet is more expensive then my parents…

    Increased Folate I believe helps people with our genetic disposition. Which also relates back to Iron deficiencies… I see this in the applied plant biology world too. You are what you eat.

    Important for pregnant women… even pre pregnancy.

    I had this thought last time I read your post linked in the article, and was poking around the internet. There’s heaps of links in support, as it directly affects the brain development.

    http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/vitamin-b9-folic-acid

    http://www.nursingtimes.net/whats-new-in-nursing/anaemia-vitamin-b12-and-folate-deficiency/1985037.article

    http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Folate_for_women

    Very interesting link..

    http://www.cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/cgi/psyc/newpsy?11.083

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3930266/

    http://cdn.intechopen.com/pdfs-wm/44001.pdf

    Real easy to read, interesting a developing country with high Neanderthal genes probably with slightly lower nutrition has higher incidences of Myopia…

    http://www.news-medical.net/news/20100913/Myopia-and-Glaucoma-genes-identified.aspx

    Instead of changing diet for the next generation…the obvious short cut and unknown side affects of gene therapy is being herald as the solution. The way I look at it, you can’t get something for nothing.

    I have good Neanderthal teeth, one of my daughters has inherited them, and the skull shape…

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