Metaphor for IQ, AH, conscientiousness, etc.

Imagine a towering bookshelf and one of those sliding ladders. On the top shelves are the books related to highly g-loaded subjects (physics, math, classics, philosophy), and the more mainstream and accepted books are toward the center, with “fringe” stuff out toward the edges.

Having a higher IQ is like having a taller ladder, so’s you can reach higher shelves and read the more difficult books. Having a high associative horizon is like having a ladder that slides properly, so’s you can reach books farther into the periphery of the fields available to your ladder height. Conscientiousness means you read books in order, according to a predetermined plan. Depending on your personality, that plan may have been picked by an external authority or by internal forces.

Psychoticism has, instead, an element of caprice. A psychotic person picks books according to momentary whim, and reads them until interest subsides, and often does not finish them. Psychotic geniuses are therefore characterized by having a very strange distribution of knowledge, which is often specialized, and they often lack common knowledge (that is, the books within a narrow range on the lower shelves). This is not the same as lacking common sense or intelligence, but is rather due to the more pressing need to satisfy internal desires. Strong external stimuli (war, starvation, etc.) can produce neurotypical-like behavior in these folks.

Having low associative horizon can be mistaken for conscientiousness, because it restricts the range of books that may be read. If only ten books are within reach, the order in which they are read matters less.

About Aeoli Pera

Maybe do this later?
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6 Responses to Metaphor for IQ, AH, conscientiousness, etc.

  1. Obadiah says:

    Having low associative horizon can be mistaken for conscientiousness, because it restricts the range of books that may be read. If only ten books are within reach, the order in which they are read matters less.

    You’ve described the inverse correlation between AH and conscientiousness as being illusory. The truth seems to be that a higher AH places a greater demand on a person’s Conscientiousness and the resulting effect where a person’s powers of conscientiousness are overwhelmed by the AH-load may produce an appearance of inverse correlation to a detached observer

  2. Obadiah says:

    You say lower AH may be mistaken for high C due to the effects of having a narrower cognitive range to deal with (and thus a lower demand placed upon C)

    I say higher AH may be mistaken for low C due to the effects of having a broader cognitive range to deal with (and thus a higher demand placed upon on C)

    We once again reach the same conclusions at the same age of 28 from the exact opposite perspective and starting point and through the exact opposite cognition and thought-process due to being an exact psychological and structural mirror.

  3. Obadiah says:

    The truth seems to be that a higher AH places a greater demand on a person’s Conscientiousness

    ^This may or may not be true (as each individual has different powers of conscientiousness), but the probability of it being true becomes greater the more sliding range they have on their ladder such that a person who can reach the top row of books and reach the farthest ends of the shelves has the greatest probability of having their powers of conscientiousness effectively encumbered by the demands of their AH, creating the appearance of the inverse correlation

  4. Obadiah says:

    This library/bookshelf metaphor is better than the railroad track metaphor that popped into my head btw. What a great fucking metaphor.

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