Warrior idealism

The warrior mindset is pretty well described in sociological terms as a friendly in-group prestige competition for tribal males. Warriors are loyal, competitive, fierce, and motivated to seek heroic glory by accomplishing great feats with courage, skill, and strength. This sociosexual strategy is more common in faithful, lawless societies, but pockets of it can generally be found anywhere (ex. special forces culture in the otherwise faithless US).

I believe there is a sort of ideal warrior archetype that can emerge from this culture, where a warrior gets addicted to the chemical reward of glory. This is analogous to the genius personality that is caused by an addiction to creativity, and there are a number of similarities. In the case of the ideal warrior, an otherwise talented but normal warrior becomes obsessed with becoming an apex predator. Achilles and Musashi are two real-life examples, but you can find romantizations of the type fairly often in fiction (particularly nordic, Han Chinese, and Japanese).

For a while I thought this type of person might indicate an edenic race that we’ve been missing, but it makes sense that this sort of addiction could pop up in any hominid because fighting and fraternity go way back in the primitive consciousness. The archetypal such figure has the following traits:

1. Preternatural athleticism, strength, and robustness to injury. This is necessary for the idealism to be somewhat plausible.

2. Psychopathy- A relentless confidence in their ability to get out of any situation, combined with a complete lack of reasonable future planning.

3. Battlefield cunning, contrasted with hopelessness in the sociopolitical sphere. This is probably a result of the neurochemicals molding their brains over time, until they see all situations through a battlefield lens.

4. Idealistic ambition- Striving to become embody and manifest the traits of an envisioned ideal warrior. As the addiction metastasizes, realizing this abstraction takes emotional precedence over the pursuit of actual glory (among comrades in arms).

Such people are useful to have around but also very difficult to control, hence the story of Achilles, Odysseus, and Agamemnon. Odysseus would be the owl melon handler here, standing in for a special forces colonel, whose job is basically to keep Achilles pointed at the enemy (and let Achilles’ personality work out the details). Some warrior idealists break free from the reins and become something like warrior monk ascetics. When these guys purity spiral they actually become less dangerous in general because they’re only interested in increasingly difficult fights, whereas the state would prefer to use them as all-purpose, low-cost WMDs.

Musashi is a great example of this. He basically just trained and navel-gazed about tiger mindset in between duels, and wrote The Book of Five Rings about the mental habits of an ideal warrior (I wonder if the “five rings” bit is a rediscovery of chakras, or something like that). One of Tolkien’s kings in the appendices was like this, to the extent that he failed to produce an heir, but I can’t remember his name off the top of my head.

As this addiction progresses the warrior gradually loses interest in anything else except as a means to the end of achieving greater accomplishments as a warrior. This includes creature comforts like sex and good food. However, the upside of having such a rare level of skill, as with the phenomenon of genius, is that it can be used to overcome remarkably difficult hurdles on a regular basis with relative ease. So the warrior idealist rarely lacks for material things when he can be bothered to desire them, his skills being in such high demand.

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23 Responses to Warrior idealism

  1. Robotnick says:

    There is a modern day stigma against these two kinds of addictions (Genius and Warrior), because they appear commonly in deep-sockets and other less Matrix-enslaved people and they can be a potential threat to the establishment.

    More single-minded focused people will always receive a lot more flak for not having a more controllable dopamine reward system like uber functional “cog in the machine” types and ADD dreamers or normalfags.

    Post modern chaos creates a “Paralysis of the will” as Nietzsche would put it. People engaging in causes for a short time, but then getting distracted by another stimulus before being able to make any great change.
    This is probably fairly obvious but I wanted to try to articulate it.

    • Aeoli Pera says:

      There is a modern day stigma against these two kinds of addictions (Genius and Warrior), because they appear commonly in deep-sockets and other less Matrix-enslaved people and they can be a potential threat to the establishment.
      >More single-minded focused people will always receive a lot more flak for not having a more controllable dopamine reward system like uber functional “cog in the machine” types and ADD dreamers or normalfags.

      I think this is true. The rest, I dunno.

  2. Aeoli Pera says:

    I wonder. There isn’t much place for such a person in a modern day fighting force. James LaFond comes to mind, particularly.

  3. Son of Distant Trebizond says:

    Saenchai is an example of a modern day combat genius. Dude’s on another level. Watching his fights, his ‘battle computer’ is of a different order to that of his opponent. High level creativity within a split second…

  4. MM says:

    This matches many anecdotes about Trump from Roger Stone etc.
    He’ll do endless phone calls. Reads letters all night. Sleeps biphasically in 2-3 hour naps.
    ENERGY FOCUS MOMENTUM (INSANE ADDICTION)

  5. Marshall Youd says:

    BTW if you haven’t seen this yet it’s fucking amazing. Truly one of the most revealing 1 and a half hours ever. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XAzSfqrzPg

  6. Just wanted to tip a hat to you. Recommended by Josh Jeppson.
    This post on warrior ethics stays within rational bounds. Love it.
    Good to see your work.

    -Curt Doolittle
    -The Propertarian Institute
    -Kiev Ukraine

  7. kensuimo says:

    3. Battlefield cunning, contrasted with hopelessness in the sociopolitical sphere. This is probably a result of the neurochemicals molding their brains over time, until they see all situations through a battlefield lens.

    No, I think this would be type derived.

    Such people are useful to have around but also very difficult to control, hence the story of Achilles, Odysseus, and Agamemnon. Odysseus would be the owl melon handler here, standing in for a special forces colonel, whose job is basically to keep Achilles pointed at the enemy (and let Achilles’ personality work out the details). Some warrior idealists break free from the reins and become something like warrior monk ascetics. When these guys purity spiral they actually become less dangerous in general because they’re only interested in increasingly difficult fights, whereas the state would prefer to use them as all-purpose, low-cost WMDs.

    That was awesome to read.

    As this addiction progresses the warrior gradually loses interest in anything else except as a means to the end of achieving greater accomplishments as a warrior. This includes creature comforts like sex and good food. However, the upside of having such a rare level of skill, as with the phenomenon of genius, is that it can be used to overcome remarkably difficult hurdles on a regular basis with relative ease. So the warrior idealist rarely lacks for material things when he can be bothered to desire them, his skills being in such high demand.

    Musashi is actually somewhat of a counterexample here. He won his last duel around 30, after which he sought to perfect brushmanship (penmanship?). Despite his renunciation of combat, his prowess, as you predict, ensured him generous company. That he nevertheless died in a cave is a testament to the purity of his mentality.

  8. bicebicebice says:

    “As this addiction progresses the warrior gradually loses interest in anything else except as a means to the end of achieving greater accomplishments as a warrior. This includes creature comforts like sex and good food. However, the upside of having such a rare level of skill, as with the phenomenon of genius, is that it can be used to overcome remarkably difficult hurdles on a regular basis with relative ease. So the warrior idealist rarely lacks for material things when he can be bothered to desire them, his skills being in such high demand.”

    All in all, highly interesting and intredasting. It resonates.

  9. Kingboss says:

    Here is a modern group that follows the warrior mindset I found a number of weeks ago:
    http://www.jack-donovan.com/axis/2014/06/a-time-for-wolves/

    They seem to be one of the few genuine attempts at recreating a real separatist movement away from mainstream society. Already larger than most indian reserves and with off-the-grid establishments, it seems they will only grow. In addition, they have auxiliaries in multiple states and increasing self-sufficiency. They may very well entirely detach themselves of the system and achieve self-governance as an all-nordic/europoid tribe.
    As far as I can tell, they are religious, dedicated, folkish and red-pilled to the max. An interview with their founder right here shows their structure and philosophy:
    http://www.counter-currents.com/2016/02/greg-johnson-interviews-paul-waggener-2/

    • Aeoli Pera says:

      Yeah, that follows the warrior mindset of seeking glory. Bros > hos is what it comes down to. Self-governance and religiosity are different categories entirely, and I expect they will succeed at neither.

  10. mendicant says:

    Seems to me these types were quite common in pre Spanish Mexico. Proportionally much more so among the Aztecs than their counterparts in Europe or Japan.

    The type, if I understand you correctly, will become a liability to ones forces if promoted too high, e.g. John bell hood or the mad baron ungern.

    The addiction to danger and glory need not manifest itself in battle. Mountaineering is much the same, most famously in Mallory’s remark about everest “because it’s there.”

    Evola is relevant here, and e.r. eddison even more so: his portrayal of Lessingham is the purest example of the ideal warrior and adventurer I’ve seen in fiction, and to some extent Eddison provided a philosophical basis for the lifestyle.

    • Aeoli Pera says:

      >Seems to me these types were quite common in pre Spanish Mexico. Proportionally much more so among the Aztecs than their counterparts in Europe or Japan.

      Could be, I’m not really familiar with those cultures.

      >The type, if I understand you correctly, will become a liability to ones forces if promoted too high, e.g. John bell hood or the mad baron ungern.

      Agreed.

      >The addiction to danger and glory need not manifest itself in battle. Mountaineering is much the same, most famously in Mallory’s remark about everest “because it’s there.”
      Evola is relevant here, and e.r. eddison even more so: his portrayal of Lessingham is the purest example of the ideal warrior and adventurer I’ve seen in fiction, and to some extent Eddison provided a philosophical basis for the lifestyle.

      Any sort of addiction to glory can likely be traced back to warrior instincts.

  11. Pingback: On Oppositional Defiant “Disorder” | Aeoli Pera

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