On creativity

The creative drive is the feeling that something ought to exist, and doesn’t yet. Contrary to popular misconception, creativity is not self-expression except insofar as it is an expression of the creative drive. The contemporary form of “art” that seeks to communicate ephemeral feelings is the artistic equivalent of camgirls masturbating for attention, and can be blamed on the moral paucity of secularists who disdain the proper meaning of the word “ought” in the definition above. Creativity has an external focus—the creative drive is an emotional reaction to the perception of a disappointing reality. Similarly, creativity is not just anything people make that’s not practical. To be called creative according to the definition I’ve given, the created thing must be appealing to somebody. Practical objects like DIN rails and grommets are therefore creative inventions, whereas the activities we group under “arts and crafts” are generally not creative unless they are practiced by someone with a creative drive.

All creativity begins with negative criticism. The natural way to respond to a reality that isn’t ideal is to say “this isn’t quite right”. The hard part is to recognize that filling the hole requires a lot of talent, skill, and work, so most of the time we don’t bother. I might decide the house I bought is ugly, but fixing it up is a lot of work and there’s a very real chance that I might botch the job and end up with something more hateful than what I started with. In order to see a project through, I have to feel like the vision is important enough that actualizing it produces less anxiety than merely sensing its absence. The story behind Vox Day’s epic fantasy series “Arts of Dark And Light” is a great example: he was so disappointed with the wasted potential of George R.R. Martin’s “Song of Fire and Ice” series that he decided to show fantasy readers how such a thing ought to be done. Suppressing most of these impulses is rational and normal; the inability to prioritize emotional reactions is the executive-dysfunctional mark of a neurotic.

Creativity comes in two primary flavors, typological and allegorical, that respectively correspond to the inductive and deductive thinking styles. Aristotle was a genius of the former kind because his focus was on getting the parts right. Plato was a genius of the latter kind because his focus was on getting the whole right.

Typological creativity is purely intuitionistic in nature, where the operating principle of a part is conceived by observation and pattern recognition. This is the sort of creativity we associate with dilettante inventors who have many unrelated parts lying around their workshops and no bigger plans for any of them (there is no greater “whole” in mind for any of the parts). Depending on the perfectionism of the inventor, it is often iterative in nature, especially if the vision is a particularly big and important one. An artist of this sort with a perfectionism streak will often have sketchbooks full of pictures that are each an attempt to perfectly capture the same theme. HP Lovecraft’s collection of cosmic horror-inspiring short stories is a great example of this sort of creativity.

The strength of typological creations is that all such inventions are inspired and usually appeal to any demographic that shares the emotionality of the creator (they sense the same “hole” in reality that the creator is trying to fill). It’s a mistake to assume that such seemingly disconnected creations are incoherent, because they can often be interpreted using dream logic. Lovecraft’s work is best understood as a reaction to the horrifying resurrection of the Babylonian death cult (as secular, utilitarian consumerism) and man’s place in it. The weakness of typological creators is that they often fail to build anything abstract or bigger than can be created in a single hyperfocus session, and they may even be opposed to the idea of doing so because this would interrupt the flow state that makes the creative act so enjoyable.

Allegorical creativity is purely functional in nature, where the larger whole is conceived first and hacked together from spare parts. Tolkien’s famous hatred of allegory in all its forms can be blamed on the stereotypically ugly, piecemeal construction and the uninspired, patronizing attitude it represents (no, alt-retards, Tolkien’s dwarves don’t represent Jews). He would not have gotten along with John C. Wright at all (they would probably come to blows), even though they have everything else in common. An allegorical construction like Aesop’s fables or word-painting in music begins with the message, manipulates it through a simple words -> picture cipher, and ends with the expression. Because humans are bad at crafting holistic systems that are also realistic the system will usually be riddled with implicit contradictions of emotional dream logic. Such creations leave a bad taste in the mouth for reasons that aren’t easily explained, because there is a strong temptation to “fill in” many places with uninspired drivel in order to finish the minimum viable product and ship it. However, I believe there is a place for allegory: a masterful artist of the typological sort who has invented a lot of spare parts can often piece them together without coming off as pedantic. The best example I know of is the city of Midgar from Final Fantasy 7.

This is an excellent example of allegory done right. The strings sound like the labored breathing of a sick and dying planet, while the player is surrounded by a shitty world full of shitty people. The bells give just a touch of hope in the overwhelmingly oppressive atmosphere, like finding a flower in the slums.

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About Aeoli Pera

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47 Responses to On creativity

  1. MM says:

    Its interesting to see the influence Joe Hisaishi has had whether it is on FF(Never played) or Keiki Kobashi, who did the soundtrack for Ace Combat 5(My fav game ever as a kid. Maybe still since I dont play games)




    ^Short but my fav from the ost for whatever reason
    Anyways, the point of all this is that Joe is the most “allegorical” composer I know of. Each feeling, character, etc. is mapped with a corresponding sound(This is his admitted workflow. And themes from older movies he did often show up again. Like the sad rising 5ths that are almost his trademark).

    The same thing you mentioned about your song, except in the general,(Sounding like x) happens a good deal in the Hisaishi stuff ie Kodama, Ohmu no Bosu, (banned from jewtube like alot of the really good Hisaishi) Nausicaa OST is the best and also the most banned besides PM!

    I suppose if fags hadnt called Ravel and Debussy “Impressionistic” it would be the best word for toxic jungle basslines and mangled guitars that represent screaming insects!

    Anways, I’ll stop rambling. Sound is bae.

  2. Akuma says:

    “The hard part is to recognize that filling the hole requires a lot of talent, skill, and work, so most of the time we don’t bother.”

    Bullshit. Money and bureaucrats are the only thing holding a creative person back.

    • MM says:

      Lack of believe in oneself and of even the possibility of success seems to be the most destructive.

      • Aeoli Pera says:

        Yeah, I gotta agree with that. After taking a huge beating that I didn’t understand at all. It took a good dose of internet grokking to make me realize that success is possible if you know a few easy truths about people, women, society, etc. My red pill path was BBC -> World Net Daily -> Vox Day -> Fred Reed, Roissy, Steve Sailer, Koanic, and Koanic -> Tex. Haven’t had any really big ones since then that I can think of, excepting the alt-right and Trump phenomena.

        • MM says:

          It seems that most people come to the red pill seeking self improvement and then often fall into learned helplessness after learning how deep the rot is. Once you know what’s going on, reading more than 20 mins of politics a day has no benefit. Transitioning into self improvement and working towards goals of self and group is only natural. But so too is the opposite, the do-nothingness of the majority…

          The biggest problem the alt right has is that it does not believe it can win…

          The number 1 solution to this problem will be new leaders with the persuasive power and style of Trump that know how to uplift their followers instead of LARPING and compulsively black-pilling.

          • > The number 1 solution to this problem will be new leaders with the persuasive power and style of Trump that know how to uplift their followers instead of LARPING and compulsively black-pilling.

            This leader will also need a positive, future vision for our GROUP/society. Is anyone working on it? There’s a lot of dystopian junk out there, but it doesn’t seem like anyone has any solid long term plans that are inspiring (lookin at you Zucks => https://www.theguardian.com/technology/shortcuts/2017/feb/17/facebook-manifesto-mark-zuckerberg-letter-world-politics). People need to believe they are part of something bigger, not just some cogs in a weird deracinated neo liberal global state with no goals sans maximizing trade and creating markets.

            • MM says:

              The vision should be for the simple existence of our people in happiness, especially SPIRITUAL happiness. Wife and kids, neighbors you trust, architecture that breathes humanity, obesity and materialism/hedonism gone, faith in God!
              People can flesh it out as they like but the things above are what we all really want.

      • > Lack of believe in oneself and of even the possibility of success seems to be the most destructive.

        > Yeah, I gotta agree with that. After taking a huge beating that I didn’t understand at all.

        Agree 100%. Still working on this.

        My past 10ish years: lack of awareness of my aspieness/INTPness (Im prob aspie more in the internet sense than full blown clinical sense) -> leave stablish home environment -> modern uni poz environmental trigger -> short term depression/anxiety -> bad normie coping methods with no dopamine rewards for doing normie stuff -> anxiety/exacerbation of aspieness INTPness -> more normie advice, more attempts to be normie -> failure/deeper depression -> loss of confidence/destruction of positive self image/lack in belief of any sort of possibilty of success -> long term depression/anxiety/total social collapse/isolation/lack of basic functioning -> slow term recovery/total rebuilding of self w/ a more realistic worldview/more awareness

        • Akuma says:

          Fuck no. They are lesser than you in everyway. Please stop with this nonsense that because they are “normal” they are better thAn you. Trump is President and he did nothing wrong. There is no excuse why these normies cannot be put in their places. It’s only fair after the way they have treated us.

        • MM says:

          Will do my best to give you the info to solve your problems(Will read another book on doing well with people next).
          In the meantime, muh new book boildown is all about how to believe in yourself!

          The No. 1 thing(Can say from experience!) is cutting out the consumption of useless or negative info, music, etc. and replacing with uplifting info. Just check the news, don’t, for ex, watch a couple hours of Alex Jones “for shits n giggles”. It’ll fuck your mood up!

          You can do it, and it will make you feel much better even if you only cut half of it out!

    • Aeoli Pera says:

      >Bullshit. Money and bureaucrats are the only thing holding a creative person back.

      That’s because you’re neurotic. Ref: “Suppressing most of these impulses is rational and normal; the inability to prioritize emotional reactions is the executive-dysfunctional mark of a neurotic.”

  3. Son of Distant Trebizond says:

    You should read some Colin Wilson.

  4. j says:

    therockclapping.gif

  5. MM says:

    Just finished a new book “The Magic Of Thinking Big”
    https://fightfailure.wordpress.com/2017/06/17/the-magic-of-thinking-big-a-total-must-read/
    Sounds average but its actually the best self improvement book I’ve read so far, word-for-word.

    Also, purpletigerbot, I saw you started a blog. Cant wait for the first post!

    ;

  6. Lizard King says:

    So, which kind of creativity is this?

  7. Heaviside says:

    >Lovecraft’s work is best understood as a reaction to the horrifying resurrection of the Babylonian death cult (as secular, utilitarian consumerism) and man’s place in it.

    No, extra-cosmic entities are real. Lovecraft was trying to warn the public (he was also a National Socialist sympathizer) and he was murdered by the government with injectable cancer developed by the Rockefeller Foundation in Puerto Rico.

  8. Santoculto says:

    ”The creative drive is the feeling that something ought to exist, and doesn’t yet”

    But i thought creative drive is correlated with perfectionism, it’s feeling that this puzzle is not complete and not exactly that something ought to exist. Maybe this idea that ”this must exist” is complementar or secondary part of this process of creative drive.

    ”That’s not okay”; ”Something is missing”, first creative drive.

    [Usually insular or specific] Hyper-perceptiveness [hyper cognitive sensibility, usually correlated with affective sensibility, this ”may” explain why there is a strong correlation between emotional unbalance and higher levels of creativity]

    that cause

    Higher curiosity

    that lead to perfectionistim.

    • Aeoli Pera says:

      >But i thought creative drive is correlated with perfectionism, it’s feeling that this puzzle is not complete and not exactly that something ought to exist. Maybe this idea that ”this must exist” is complementar or secondary part of this process of creative drive.

      Almost the same thing. There’s no contradiction here.

  9. Santoculto says:

    *Perfectionism

    ”Creativity has an external focus—the creative drive is an emotional reaction to the perception of a disappointing reality. ”

    This.

    Emotional AND cognitive, but

    somebody already defined the conceptual boundaries of this terms*

    • Santoculto says:

      Sorry, PSYCHOLOGICAL, that’s basically the same thing.

      • Santoculto says:

        Cognitive tasks: tasks that are less ”personal”.

        Psychological tasks: tasks that are more ”personal”.

        Sorry again, emotional is part of psychological, not exactly the same thing.

        What is the real difference between a cognitive and a psychological tasks**

        Cognitive is more objective, goal-oriented, while psychological is less.

        ”Hunt a food” = cognitive. ”Talking with people on the tribe” = psychological.

        ”To solve mathematic questions in school = cognitive. ”Talking with your friend OR thinking about your attitude in the last weekend”.

        Intelligence, seems, for most people on the HBD, is just COGNITIVE ability, AND ”cognitive and psychological” are two ”completely” different things, isn’t*

  10. Athene noctua says:

    I found it striking how close they got it.

  11. Ophiucuck says:

    The link between inductive/deductive thinking and typological/allegorical creative output feels thin/tenuous, but that’s probably due more to my own lack of knowledge/mental grasp of typological vs. allegorical storytelling. Great post.

  12. You would enjoy learning about deep learning I think: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r5XKzjTFCZQ

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