Price entropy

The first thing I learned in the corporate world is that only mom and pop shops pay list price for anything. Large businesses prefer other large customers and suppliers with predictable, long-term contracts.

Two laws of corporate spending

This is worth expanding upon, briefly.

Mises’ argument against socialism applies to a corporatist world as well (conservatives and fascists alike, please take note). To summarize briefly, the problem with economic calculation in the socialist commonwealth is price setting. Prices are a flow of self-regulating information between supply and demand. If prices are set by a central authority, the communication between raw material suppliers, machine builders, and consumers is interrupted. This results in chaotic overproduction, underproduction, and so forth, which is only a good thing if you’re a globalist ideologue slash chaos magician.

Price entropy is the idea where different prices are offered to different people, and sometimes different prices are even offered to the same person (in the case of corporate schizophrenia, aka Scott Adams’ “confusopoly“). The result, as before, is that it is difficult to know how much anything is actually worth in comparison with everything else. This occurs in small ways with the common practice of haggling (as is popular among social competitors and nonwhites), and in very large ways with the practice of corporate favoritism and renegotiation of multiple contracts. Social competitors love the feeling of getting a good deal, and it’s this force of behavioral economics that drives mothers to shop around and clip coupons, homeowners to refinance their mortgages, and salesmen to refuse to talk about price when closing a sale.

I won’t go so far as to condemn any of these practices like Kant would, because we have to live in the world as it is, but I will condemn the entropy it produces en masse as analogous to the phenomenon of good money driving out bad. And I believe this is the source of the white man’s distaste for haggling—he would rather everyone just say yes or no, and be done with it.

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About Aeoli Pera

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10 Responses to Price entropy

  1. “Prices are a flow of self-regulating information between supply and demand.”

    Compressing something complex like “supply and demand” into a one-dimensional measure is bound to have some compression artifacts appear. Or?

    • Aeoli Pera says:

      It does. Money allows people to rationalize their narcissism in small ways. Altruism is selfishness, properly understood. The introduction of Mammon creates selfishness improperly understood.

  2. Pseudorandom Bypasser says:

    >Social competitors love the feeling of getting a good deal, and it’s this force of behavioral economics that drives mothers to shop around and clip coupons, homeowners to refinance their mortgages, and salesmen to refuse to talk about price when closing a sale.

    This resonates with what I’ve been thinking the last few days. Normies are simply unable to think in terms of utility and everything is socializing and competition to them. They truly feel like they lost something if the result was reached rationally instead of games and other monkey business. Same for making plans and how they feel like being manipulated if the suggested plan is presented in a cold and task-focused instead of goodfeelz-producing way. This could be expanded to how some pathologically empathetic people feel like they are “forced” to do something when they actually act independently. I think this is based on the same mechanism as psychotic control delusions, whatever it is.

    • Aeoli Pera says:

      To restate in my own words, social competitors are incapable of mutual benefit because they define “benefit” = winning at social competition, which requires a loser.

  3. mobiuswolf says:

    I thought it was just me.

  4. mendicant says:

    Don’t knock haggling. I survived for years gainfully unemployed as a weekend flea market vendor. Much of this was in a very white area of Appalachia, fwiw.

    Nepotism in pricing of mass produced goods and commodities is a different matter.

    • Aeoli Pera says:

      >Don’t knock haggling. I survived for years gainfully unemployed as a weekend flea market vendor.

      I don’t knock WINNING, per se, but I do knock abstract forms of parasitism because someone has to.

      >Nepotism in pricing of mass produced goods and commodities is a different matter.

      Same matter, but moreso.

  5. ///M M/// says:

    -Trump cucks hard. “Muh Russia” now “Muh kkk”. No wall, no tax reform. At least we will get that Venezuela invasion and increased women quotas in STEM like (((we))) voted for!

    -Vox Day rips SJWs, attacks alt reich. The ”strategic genius” decides the best course of action is to have no strategy and no genius. Refuses leadership because underneath his “Supreme Dark Lord” gamma delusion he knows he is a coward and a fucktard.

    -The rest of the Right doing what it always does. Addiction to losing grows stronger.
    Understanding of “muh optics” used to criticize alt reich and that which has already occurred and cannot be changed. To no positive effect, of course. Understanding “muh optics” could be used for re-framing, attacking left. That would make too much sense!

    The upside: Many people are very very angry at above stupidity. Radicalization will quicken. The optimism of Trump will die, bubble economy bursts, all things in our favor and in favor of the demographics- the ticking time bomb, the one sure way to our defeat-the slow burn!.
    ….

    In any case, Im done wasting my time on this low-level news. We know what will happen on macro.

    We need better leaders. That is what matters. And to make leaders you must become one!

  6. Septagon says:

    I would say that the uncoordinated voluntary interactions of individuals agreeing on a variety of prices for the same good would generate far less entropy than a central authority dictating a single price for the same good.

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