Vampire Hunter D: All Melonboons Go Back (to the heavens)

This movie falls into the 5th percenter category of awesome, but not sublime. Like Cowboy Bebop, I’d recommend it to normies without qualification.

There are a couple of excellent edenic archetypes that deserve mentioning without overmuch elaboration. The protagonist, a human-vampire hybrid, is a very good representation of MT personality (which is to say, as much personality as cannot be crushed by an indomitable will) and their basic inability to belong anywhere. Baron Meier Link’s story is a sympathetic tragedy of melonhead melancholy about the slow extinction of their subspecies. This supports my theory that vampires are a reliable mythical stand-in for charming melonhead sociopaths.

As the story progresses, Meier Link’s abduction of Charlotte turns out to not be as it seemed, as it’s revealed that Charlotte willingly ran away with Meier Link as his lover. Charlotte rightfully feared that no one would understand their relationship, with her a human and Link a vampire.

Infogalactic

Their relationship doesn’t work out. I wouldn’t bet money on this having an esoteric meaning, but if it does then it means that melon-sapiens hybridization isn’t a viable strategy for preserving aristocratic genes.

In the final act of the film, Meier Link transports Charlotte in his carriage to the Castle of Chaythe, where Countess Carmilla, Meier Link’s matron, waits for them. Carmilla, a ghost of a vampire who died long ago, reigned supreme within the Castle of Chaythe when vampires were all-powerful and unchallenged. However, her bloodlust was so strong that D’s father, an ancient, noble vampire king, killed her in disgust.

I interpret this as a reference to the tendency of the feminine drives to get out of hand in failing civilizations, this ghost being the last relic of a dead race.

Carmilla promises Meier Link and Charlotte travel to a far away city known as the City of The Night, where they can be free to love each other, which they will travel to in a large and ancient spaceship-like structure hidden beneath the Castle of Chaythe. Carmilla explains that most ancient castles had similar ships hidden within them, and that back when vampires reigned supreme, these ships weren’t an uncommon means for vampires to travel to far regions.

I’m very confident in the interpretation of this part, using the aesthetic correspondence of space = heaven = supernatural realm, which is a very robust cipher. Just as airships = enlightened journey, spaceships = transdimensional journey, i.e. death or some other form of detachment from the material world.

It’s a good movie. You should watch it and tell me my interpretation is right and I’m the smartest guy.

About Aeoli Pera

Maybe do this later?
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7 Responses to Vampire Hunter D: All Melonboons Go Back (to the heavens)

  1. Koanic says:

    The perfect film. It resists your style of analysis because it is myth not allegory, and defies reduction.

    Also, it is an MT film in which T-backs are either villains or underpowered humans.

    The moral climax of the film was the honor duel with the werewolf. Everyone else was compromised and fated to fall. He is the film’s victor, his many litters loyally serving the Barberois.

    You will note he completed his escort mission.

  2. Colby says:

    I thought his shit talking right hand was the main character of the story. At least that made the more interesting than the usual vampire tale.

  3. Lizard King says:

    Fuck you Aeoli! Cowboy Bebop is da bestest!

    :P

  4. Glenn MT says:

    This is one of the most beautiful looking films I’ve ever seen, enough to keep my interest to the end. I was unimpressed with the story, though, although I liked the ending.

    Have you seen Shiki, AP? It’s a well-done take on how a predatory group (vampires, in this case) can infiltrate a high-trust community. The majority opinion is that it’s a slow start with a stronger ending, but my opinion is the reverse.

  5. Obadiah says:

    >You should watch it and tell me my interpretation is right and I’m the smartest guy.

    I am afraid Koanic is in fact the smartest guy. You are merely the best.

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