Breeding out science

I found a black pilling article by bakadesuyo while researching incels for my latest podcast with Boneflour:

For those who are still members of the virginity club, a number of reasons are given, including religious or moral qualms, fear of pregnancy, and “just haven’t found the right person” (more men than women between the ages of 15-24 report still waiting for Ms. or Mr. Right).

But for those not saving themselves for love, marriage, or George Clooney—and not wanting to be an outlier statistic—here are some helpful pointers.

  • First of all, if you’re still in college, stay away from math and the sciences. A survey taken at Wellesley College found that 72% of biology majors and 83% of biochemistry and math majors were virgins.
  • What major maximizes the chance you will finally do the deed? Studio art. Yes, it turns out the same Wellesley survey uncovered the fact that none of the studio art majors who responded were virgins. It could be that all those hours spent studying naked studio models have some effect.
  • You could also stop going to church so often. Men and women who went to church at least once a week were respectively 5 and 3.9 times more likely to be virgins than those who attended church less often.
  • If that’s not an option, you could join the military or go to prison—two populations that report lower rates of virginity than for the average population.

For well-educated ladies looking to join the ranks of the sexually active, unfortunately you’ve got your work cut out for you. Female college graduates are 5.4 times more likely to be virgins than those who never received that diploma—adding a sad irony to the term “bachelor’s degree.”

But before you smart men start to get too smug, realize that, sadly, a lot of you won’t be losing your virginity anytime soon either. According to researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 39.8% of boys with an average IQ score have had sex, while only 29.2% of boys with an IQ above 110 have done the deed. Memo to genius boys: Less Nietzsche, more Jersey Shore.

Eric Barker
Virginity: How many people over 25 are still virgins?

Everybody fucking loves science but apparently no one fucks and/or loves scientists. Chad theater arts majors and other flat earthers rejoice, you may not be able to define retrograde motion with the aid of a dictionary but you’ve bred virgin Copernicus right out of the genepool! If he was so smart, why is he dead?

The bit about church attendance bodes ill, given that the Christian worldview is absolutely necessary for a rigorous natural philosophy:

Pearcey and Thaxton, in their book, The Soul of Science, explain in great detail that it was the ideals and assumptions of Christianity that led to science and thus greater technological advances.

These ideals and assumptions include:

  • Belief that the universe was created and ordered by a transcendent, rational mind
  • Belief that the universe is lawful and knowable
  • Belief in the reality of the physical world
  • Belief that the physical world is of value
  • Viewing physical work as noble, as a divine calling
  • The Biblical admonishment to test claims
  • Viewing the study of nature as a proper form of worship
  • Belief in linear time
  • Belief that mathematics forms the substrate of the physical world

Every non-Christian culture lacks at least one, and usually several, of these, which are all necessary for the development and advancement of science. This is why the intellectually advanced Greeks, and the technologically advanced Romans and Chinese, did not develop science, while the “backwards” medieval European Christians did.

The implications are obvious:

  1. If progressives are ever successful in completely secularizing the West, we will be relegated to second-world status.
  2. If Asians, with their superior IQs and self-discipline, ever become Christian in sufficiently large numbers, they will eat our lunch in terms of scientific and technological advancements.

This is why any efforts to make America and Europe great are doomed unless they are centered around Christianity.

Stickwick
Mailvox: the necessity of Christianity

About Aeoli Pera

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14 Responses to Breeding out science

  1. Heaviside says:

    Western science was founded by heretics and occultists. The most advanced Asian nation is also the least Christian one. When Christian missionaries came to China, it didn’t get any more advanced, but a hundred million people died.

    • Fox says:

      This is true.

    • Ø says:

      >When Christian missionaries came to China, it didn’t get any more advanced, but a hundred million people died.

      >Hong Xiuquan’s little project
      >Actual Christianity, as opposed to a pretext and tool for a power-grab

      Pick one

      • Heaviside says:

        Imagine trying to explain that to 19th century Japanese leaders. “Yeah, tens of millions of people died in a massive civil war that almost destroyed the largest country on Earth, but don’t worry, that wasn’t real Christianity. It’ll work out better this time, I promise!” Thankfully, they chose the path of adopting Western technology and industry without adopting Western culture and religion.

        • glosoli says:

          Those Japs are virtually Saints, even without Christianity:

          https://infogalactic.com/info/Japanese_war_crimes

          ‘Perceived failure or insufficient devotion to the Emperor would attract punishment, frequently of the physical kind.[37] In the military, officers would assault and beat men under their command, who would pass the beating on to lower ranks, all the way down. In POW camps, this meant prisoners received the worst beatings of all,[38] partly in the belief that such punishments were merely the proper technique to deal with disobedience.[37]’

          ‘R. J. Rummel, a professor of political science at the University of Hawaii, estimates that between 1937 and 1945, the Japanese military murdered from nearly 3 to over 10 million people, most likely 6 million Chinese, Taiwanese, Singaporeans, Malaysians, Indonesians, Koreans, Filipinos and Indochinese, among others, including Western prisoners of war. According to Rummel, “This democide [i.e., death by government] was due to a morally bankrupt political and military strategy, military expediency and custom, and national culture.”[59] ‘

          ‘According to one estimate, the experiments carried out by Unit 731 alone caused 3,000 deaths.[72] Furthermore, according to the 2002 International Symposium on the Crimes of Bacteriological Warfare, the number of people killed by the Imperial Japanese Army germ warfare and human experiments is around 580,000.[73] According to other sources, “tens of thousands, and perhaps as many as 400,000, Chinese died of bubonic plague, cholera, anthrax and other diseases …”, resulting from the use of biological warfare’

          ‘Many written reports and testimonies collected by the Australian War Crimes Section of the Tokyo tribunal, and investigated by prosecutor William Webb (the future Judge-in-Chief), indicate that Japanese personnel in many parts of Asia and the Pacific committed acts of cannibalism against Allied prisoners of war. In many cases this was inspired by ever-increasing Allied attacks on Japanese supply lines, and the death and illness of Japanese personnel as a result of hunger. According to historian Yuki Tanaka: “cannibalism was often a systematic activity conducted by whole squads and under the command of officers”.[109] This frequently involved murder for the purpose of securing bodies. For example, an Indian POW, Havildar Changdi Ram, testified that: “[on November 12, 1944] the Kempeitai beheaded [an Allied] pilot. I saw this from behind a tree and watched some of the Japanese cut flesh from his arms, legs, hips, buttocks and carry it off to their quarters … They cut it [into] small pieces and fried it.”[‘

          One has to wonder at the morality of a person who attempts to argue that Japs are better than the Christian West. One can only conclude that they are evil, and condone evil, and promote evil and love evil, and quite probably would happily eat us Christians given half a chance. Certainly they hate truth, good and love.

          It’s good to see the polarity being exposed on this blog, well done Aeoli, may God bless you for your efforts here, and may He curse his enemies.

          • Ø says:

            >“Yeah, tens of millions of people died in a massive civil war that almost destroyed the largest country on Earth, but don’t worry, that wasn’t real Christianity. It’ll work out better this time, I promise!”

            I’m pretty certain that “Thou shalt commit blasphemy against the Son of Man while forcing your male and female followers to adhere to strict sexual moral rules while simultaneously keeping a harem of concubines for yourself and inner circle over the course of your blood-drenched, ferocious and implacable campaign to become a God-king” is not one of the Ten Commandments, but I might have to go and double-check.

            • Aeoli Pera says:

              You could also make the case that real communism has never been tried because its leaders didn’t live up to its ideals (excepting perhaps Pol Pot). This is why Heaviside phrased his critique that way.

              However, I’d make the case that Christianity was never intended to be a civic religion, such that theocracy, dominionism, legalism, and the church militant would all be heresies.

            • Aeoli Pera says:

              Granted, there is no Communist equivalent for a leader who believes he’s the reincarnation of Jesus’ younger brother.

        • glosoli says:

          Silence from the cannibal.

          The darkness hates the light.

  2. teotoon says:

    “What major maximizes the chance you will finally do the deed? Studio art. Yes, it turns out the same Wellesley survey uncovered the fact that none of the studio art majors who responded were virgins. It could be that all those hours spent studying naked studio models have some effect.”

    This reminds me of an essay written by a Renaissance artist that I read years ago: he was discussing those apprentices who spend seven years learning the trade; but, at the last, realize they have no talent for the craft; he wonders what is to become of them; for after seven years, they have become immoral.

  3. Post Alley Crackpot says:

    There was an Asimov story that I remember (perhaps slightly in error) about a powerful supercomputer that turned out to be a huge joke …

    A highly playful interstellar species known as the Chirpsithra didn’t have a need for advanced computers, but the Humans wanted one, and so the Chirpsithra gave them some directions for how to build one.

    As Humans created more CPUs for the computer and fed it more data, the computer reached a point at which it would demand yet more CPUs and even more data, sucking into its computational vortex a significant amount of investment cash and a lot of attention, leading the people behind the great build to hope there would be a pay-off some day in the future …

    One day, much to the surprise of the Humans, the computer stopped asking for more data and promptly shut itself down.

    Some people got it to reboot and it promptly shut itself down again.

    After learning that the computer had not only shut itself down again but also made it much more difficult to power back on, the Humans asked the Chirpsithra what was going on.

    That was the joke: build a computer smart enough and powerful enough and it’ll learn just enough about the true nature of the universe that it’ll shut itself down for good.

    That was also why the Chirpsithra didn’t build computers anymore and why they thought this was a great joke to play on the Humans.

    There may have in fact been a point I was trying to draw in parallel to this, but for the moment it has escaped me, possibly because that part of my thinking decided it would shut down. :-)

    • Aeoli Pera says:

      >That was the joke: build a computer smart enough and powerful enough and it’ll learn just enough about the true nature of the universe that it’ll shut itself down for good.

      If you told it to maximize utility, yes. If you told it to maximize godliness you’d get Koanic.

  4. Pingback: WTF I love the IRS now | Aeoli Pera

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