Request for Asperger’s-specific resources

I’m currently thinking about specific problems facing people with Asperger’s, regarding GUToW implementation. If there are any resources you found helpful, either for clearly defining the problem or solving one of the issues, please let me know. The best one I know of is Temple Grandin’s guide for choosing a career field, H/T to whoever e-mailed me that a while back.

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20 Responses to Request for Asperger’s-specific resources

    • Jordy LaFrog Peterson's Fully Automated Mecha-Dragonslayer says:

      Hmmm. This website won’t allow me to highlight text. Well, that’s irritating.

      >number 7

      What if you know because you can totally read minds but you don’t care so you engage in meaningless pleasantries for the sake of politeness? Is it still your fault?

      >number 9

      What if you know that ‘no’ actually means ‘yes’ but you still refuse to play annoying mind games with non-enemies? Seeing it and getting it doesn’t make it less tedious.

      Maybe it’s possible to appreciate autistic thought intuitively without actually being autistic.

      • Aeoli Pera says:

        >Is it still your fault?

        The question no longer makes sense in that context.

        >What if you know that ‘no’ actually means ‘yes’ but you still refuse to play annoying mind games with non-enemies?

        Then you’re simply disagreeable and not autistic.

        >Maybe it’s possible to appreciate autistic thought intuitively without actually being autistic.

        There is pretty clearly a spectrum from sapiens to neanderthal where cro magnon has one foot in autism and one foot in normie.

        • Jordy LaFrog Peterson's Fully Automated Mecha-Dragonslayer says:

          >There is pretty clearly a spectrum from sapiens to neanderthal where cro magnon has one foot in autism and one foot in normie.

          Yes, but we’ll need something that looks like one of those color charts (but all tetrachromatic instead of RGB) in order to account for other Edenic types.

          • Aeoli Pera says:

            Sure, that’s a good comparison.

            Except, races don’t exist because you can’t define where blue ends and green begins, therefore colors don’t exist, etc.

      • Anonanon says:

        >number 7

        Well, yes. A lot of people are tagged as Aspies that are not.
        If you are repulsed by “games people play” and maybe even find it ghastly how such games occupy a good part of their material and mental life, you have no autism/are no Aspie — although likely to be called that.

        Proper Aspies and autistic people do not see the Game (or the games), or if they see, they can’t decode it.

        • Aeoli Pera says:

          Mostly correct. I think we are merely stupid in this area, not categorically incapable. So, I’d describe a grown aspie as an adult body and adult brain with the heart of a child, and a gifted aspie as an adult body and gifted brain with the heart of an average 12-year-old.

  1. Ø says:

    That whole list on the Actually Autistic Blogs page seems like it would have some great resources buried in there; same goes for websites like WrongPlanet

    • Aeoli Pera says:

      Good point. The real trouble will be sorting the wheat from the chaff, and reframing where necessary to account for Edenic observations (e.g. what’s anti-neanderthal racism vs. what’s neanderthal dysfunction).

  2. Mr. T. says:

    “Temple Grandin’s guide for choosing a career field, “

    Do you mean Autism.com’s page Temple Grandin: Choosing the Right Job (https://www.autism.com/advocacy_grandin_job)? Or something else?

  3. Mr. T. says:

    Applying Cognitive Behavioral Therapy’s principles to Asperger’s issues would probably be useful to many. To me the non-aspie spesific book “Feeling Good” (David Burns) was extremely useful in tackling depression+anxiety. Cover the basic common problems/issues first!

    Valerie L. Gaus has written two books that probably (haven’t read them but seem promising based on reviews) have a similar approach but are more Asperger’s related:
    – Living Well on the Spectrum: How to Use Your Strengths to Meet the Challenges of Asperger Syndrome/High-Functioning Autism (https://www.amazon.com/Living-Well-Spectrum-Challenges-High-Functioning/dp/1606236342/) – seems promising, might buy myself
    – Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adult Asperger Syndrome (Guides to Individualized Evidence-Based Treatment) – possibly interesting, was quoted in a Youtube video presentation by Sarah Hendrickx

    • Aeoli Pera says:

      I remember picking up Living Well at the library but then I moved and had to give it back before getting to it. Then I forgot it existed.

      This is good stuff, thanks.

      • Mr. T. says:

        Doing the exercises consistently requires some commitment and effort, though. But CBT has proven results and (for many) helps to fix things. I would say that most people (not just Asperger’s people) would find it useful, bad thinking habits are so common. They cause a lot of needless suffering.

        I would also recommend (another) Burns’s book “Intimate Connections” which has a useful perspective on relationship/women things, reading too much game and pickup stuff first can make you depressed and cynical.

        • Aeoli Pera says:

          Good stuff. I’d rephrase your criticism though: the problem with reading Game stuff is it can make you resentful if you are 1) not religious, 2) not personally successful, or both. A fair bit of cynicism regarding the fair sex is quite healthy and it’s truly difficult to overestimate the perfidy of wahman.

          • Mr. T. says:

            It’s pretty difficult to know where people are coming from. For example I’ve been reading a lot of game material for years and I’m a bit older (36) so it’s hard to know what the “General Perspective” is with younger people. Sometimes a reminder of the “better things” and a gentle touch is needed (there can be decent people/women out there), sometimes definitely more cynicism and “manipulation/appereances”. And of course everything does need to be calibrated to individuals — for example aspie-aspie vs. aspie-neurotypical relationships would differ on average. So it depends and depends again…

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